Tips For Consumers From Food Science

Category Archives: Beans

Why do you have to soak beans for a day?

“Why do you have to soak beans for a day?”

It sure does seem like a pain when you’re hungry to be working on tomorrow’s dinner, after all, but the fact is that soaking beans for a day makes healthier beans and they actually cook more quickly.

Beans have a substance called phytic acid which bind to magnesium, iron, zinc, and calcium and keep you from absorbing as much of these minerals as you would have otherwise. Particularly if you rely on beans for iron and zinc as complete vegetarians do, you will benefit from soaking your beans.

I actually recommend soaking them for quite a few hours (18 give or take) at high temperatures (140 degrees give or take, mainly take). I’m kind of scared of the 140 degree recommendation, however. I have never had the tools to keep it at that temperature and someone reports to me that she does and they were funky. Eeww. I’d probably cook them up anyway, but who wants to deal with funky? (I may try to reproduce it because now I’m curious.) In any case, I start my soak water out pretty warm and then don’t worry about it until I add more water. When the beans have soaked up most of their water, I add more and I add it at a pretty high temperature. In the winter I’m sure it’s down to 40 degrees in about three minutes in our century-old historic brothel, but I can’t really worry about that. I eat beans and enjoy them regardless.

If you would like to read more than a ramble, go to the article at the Rebuild site on soaking beans. It has the graphs you see in the soaking beans video below (plus an extra or two).

Green beans & phytic acid

Beans as a class have high levels of phytic acid which can inhibit your mineral absorption. However, the highest levels are found in the mature bean, dried for us that we hydrate later and cook. What about green beans? These are immature beans in a pod and we generally eat the whole pod. We eatContinue Reading

Edamame & phytates

We have seen that soy has high levels of has high level of phytates (soy phytates). Soy milk is high in phytic acid as well. What about the immature form of the bean, edamame? Edamame is often enjoyed as a snack. You can purchase the pods and pop out the beans to eat as aContinue Reading

Tofu & phytates

Soy in general has high levels of phytic acid (soy phytic acid). Soy milk is high in phytic acid as well and tofu is no exception. In a 1985 study of phytic acid in soy, researchers examined the remaining phytic acid after different stages of soy preparation. Typically we see some reduction in phytic acidContinue Reading

Phytic acid in soy milk

When you turn over a tub of tofu or a carton of soy milk and marvel at the amount of magnesium in that bean curd, beware that precious little of it will make it into your brain cells. Likewise, little of the native calcium, zinc, or iron will nourish your body. Soy is high inContinue Reading

Soaking beans

On their face, legumes appear to be rich in minerals. But you are absorbing only about half of the mineral content of your legumes that you deserve to be absorbing. To rebuild from depression, we need our zinc, magnesium, and iron. If beans make up a large part of your diet, there is a realContinue Reading

Tips For Consumers From Food Science

Category Archives: Beans

Why do you have to soak beans for a day?

“Why do you have to soak beans for a day?”

It sure does seem like a pain when you’re hungry to be working on tomorrow’s dinner, after all, but the fact is that soaking beans for a day makes healthier beans and they actually cook more quickly.

Beans have a substance called phytic acid which bind to magnesium, iron, zinc, and calcium and keep you from absorbing as much of these minerals as you would have otherwise. Particularly if you rely on beans for iron and zinc as complete vegetarians do, you will benefit from soaking your beans.

I actually recommend soaking them for quite a few hours (18 give or take) at high temperatures (140 degrees give or take, mainly take). I’m kind of scared of the 140 degree recommendation, however. I have never had the tools to keep it at that temperature and someone reports to me that she does and they were funky. Eeww. I’d probably cook them up anyway, but who wants to deal with funky? (I may try to reproduce it because now I’m curious.) In any case, I start my soak water out pretty warm and then don’t worry about it until I add more water. When the beans have soaked up most of their water, I add more and I add it at a pretty high temperature. In the winter I’m sure it’s down to 40 degrees in about three minutes in our century-old historic brothel, but I can’t really worry about that. I eat beans and enjoy them regardless.

If you would like to read more than a ramble, go to the article at the Rebuild site on soaking beans. It has the graphs you see in the soaking beans video below (plus an extra or two).

Green beans & phytic acid

Beans as a class have high levels of phytic acid which can inhibit your mineral absorption. However, the highest levels are found in the mature bean, dried for us that we hydrate later and cook. What about green beans? These are immature beans in a pod and we generally eat the whole pod. We eatContinue Reading

Edamame & phytates

We have seen that soy has high levels of has high level of phytates (soy phytates). Soy milk is high in phytic acid as well. What about the immature form of the bean, edamame? Edamame is often enjoyed as a snack. You can purchase the pods and pop out the beans to eat as aContinue Reading

Tofu & phytates

Soy in general has high levels of phytic acid (soy phytic acid). Soy milk is high in phytic acid as well and tofu is no exception. In a 1985 study of phytic acid in soy, researchers examined the remaining phytic acid after different stages of soy preparation. Typically we see some reduction in phytic acidContinue Reading

Phytic acid in soy milk

When you turn over a tub of tofu or a carton of soy milk and marvel at the amount of magnesium in that bean curd, beware that precious little of it will make it into your brain cells. Likewise, little of the native calcium, zinc, or iron will nourish your body. Soy is high inContinue Reading

Soaking beans

On their face, legumes appear to be rich in minerals. But you are absorbing only about half of the mineral content of your legumes that you deserve to be absorbing. To rebuild from depression, we need our zinc, magnesium, and iron. If beans make up a large part of your diet, there is a realContinue Reading